All posts tagged: medicinal plants

In EcoKatLA’s Medicinal Garden & Growing Medicinals In The CA Drought

It’s been a tough year for most of our growing friends- especially ones who grow plants used for medicines. Many had to make challenging decisions due to the exceptionally dry conditions. Our friend Kat, joining us today from LA today is no exception. Without optimal soil nourishment, the drought had her thinking twice about how she’d be wise with her resources this season, yet still grow the healing plants she’s known for providing the greater Los Angeles community. We caught up with Kat in her medicinal garden for a chat on what her season looked like. Garden Eats: What new herbs or plants are you growing this year Kat? Kat: We’re growing a few new varieties this year that will add to the resiliency of our gardens. One was gifted to us by a friend, an Ice Cream Bean tree (Inga edulis), which is a fast-growing, nitrogen- fixing and drought-tolerant shade tree that bares bean pods after about three years. The pods are filled with beans and surrounding them is this cottony white filling that …

Ask Garden Eats: Questions About Garlic Nutrition

Q: I made greens-n-beans tonight for dinner (one of my favorites) and my husband and I noticed the garlic was not tasty at all. I certainly put TONS in the dish. This week my husband brought home a different type of garlic that had light purple skin on it. Not sure the name. The other garlic we usually eat and like has the white, flakey skin and cloves are easier to peel. Is there a difference in taste and potency in garlic? Do you think it also matters how it’s cooked and could it lose nutritional value along with flavor? Michelle Rochester, New York Garden Eats: That’s a common question Michelle, thanks for asking. Most of the United State’s garlic is grown in California because of its mild climate. Although white garlic is the most common variety, the purple skinned Russian, Italian and Persian garlic is also quite popular. While white is known for lasting longer with a strong taste, purple, while milder retains its taste longer over time. Because soil composition affects the taste …

New High Line Section Opens Tomorrow: NYC

One of my favorite ways to get there… Planning a stroll along Manhattan’s West side tomorrow? Why not move up in the world and get there via the new section two of The High Line… Tomorrow, the 8th of June is the first full day the new stretch will be open to the public. Access points (from street level) are available on this handy dandy map! Can’t make it quite yet? Take a virtual tour from the generous flickr contributors here.

Edible Flowers: Freesia

In Southern California today? Step into your yard to check out all that’s blooming. Have you noticed the new vibrant flowers dotting the ice plants? No doubt you’ve seen the poppies blowing everywhere! Chances are good you’ve got a variety of flowers popping up in your yard just waiting to be… Eaten!? Edible flowers have been a world-wide main-stay for centuries. Italians love their squash blooms in sauce while Indians their rose petals in water. In our New York garden we plant border marigolds to keep the pesky little pests out. Their bitter nature wards off intruders for the season and later double as a zesty addition to salads and dressings. … From my yard here in Cali, I like to infuse a tisane of freesias, meyer lemon juice and zest. The peppery scent and bold colors offer the perfect mid-afternoon pick-me up! Make It What You’ll Need 3 handfuls of freesia flowers 2 meyer lemons 4 cups H20 zest of half a lemon Putting It Together In a sauce pan (ceramic and glass best), …