Fall & Winter Recipes, Make Food & Eat
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Happy Tummy Congee Recipe

With the winter winds already blowing in a lot of cold, snow and damp conditions, it’s time to break out the congee recipes to keep your spleen and stomach qi warm and happy!

Photo by Ricky Qi

Congee, a regular staple of the Chinese breakfast menu, is a nutritive mixture of white rice, water and mung bean. Developed to enhance and harmonize digestion, this simple recipe can help stave off intestinal illness as well as fix you up during acute GI distress. Experiencing nausea, diarrhea, constipation or vomiting along with a cold or flu – this stuff is your best friend!

Mung beans and rice may sound a little boring, but if nothing else is staying down, congee will!

 

 

Photo by Geisha Boy 500. See my list of extras to spruce it up, add nutrition and regulate immunity.

What You’ll Need:

Congee Base

  • 5 cups water
  • 1 1/2 cups white rice
  • 1/4 cup mung beans

The Yummy Extras

  • 1/4 tsp cinnamon
  • 1/8 tsp cardamon
  • 3 pieces of da zao (Chinese red date)
  • handful of shitake mushrooms
  • 3 tsp black sesame seeds


Putting it all Together:

  1. Boil the water in a ceramic or glass pan
  2. Add beans and rice
  3. Add your extras*
  4. Boil approx 45 minutes on med-low stirring occasionally

Note: Want it to be creamy, like porridge? Cook your congee longer by gradually adding water and occasionally stirring. Can also be made over the course of seven-ten hours in a crock pot.

*Add cinnamon and cardamon the last half hour of cooking

Why You’ll Love Congee

  • Enhances immunity
  • Harmonizes digestion
  • Improves metabolism
  • Super Tasty!
  •  

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This entry was posted in: Fall & Winter Recipes, Make Food & Eat

by

C H R I S T I N E Dionese, co-founder of flavor ID and Garden Eats is an integrative health & food therapy specialist, medical & food journalist. She has dedicated her career to helping others understand the science of happiness and its powerful effects on everyday human health by harnessing the power of the epigenetic landscape. To balance the more serious side of her work, she loves to concoct, write about and connect people through food & drink. You can check out her latest work at The Chalkboard Magazine, The Fullest and Rochester's Boomtown Table. Christine lives, works and plays between Southern California & Upstate New York.

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